2019 Seed Call for Proposals Assessment Panel

Meet the assessment panel who carefully reviewed each of the 120 applications for Seed funding in 2019, which closed on 21 March 2019.

John Hine - Chair

Emeritus Professor School of Engineering and Computer Science
Victoria University of Wellington
Read about John

 

David Williams

Professor in Electrochemistry, Chemical Sciences
University of Auckland
Read about David

 

Gill Dobbie

Professor, Department of Computer Science
University of Auckland
Read about Gill

 

Kevin Ross

Director of Research
Orion Health
Read about Kevin

 

Margaret Hyland

Professor, Vice-Provost (Research)
Victoria University of Wellington
Read about Margaret

 

Mengjie Zhang

Professor, School of Engineering and Computer Science
Victoria University of Wellington
Read about Mengjie

 

Richard Green

Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science & Software Engineering
University of Canterbury
Read about Richard

 

Mike Duke

Professor, Chair in Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering
University of Waikato
Read about Mike

 

Simon Bickerton

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering
University of Auckland
Read about Simon

 

Alistair Scarfe

Founder & Chief Technical Officer
RoboticsPlus
Read about Alistair

 

The Panel will also include members of the SfTI management team, Kāhui Māori and programme office - Katharina Ruckstuhl, Stephen MacDonell, Don Cleland, Bruce MacDonald, Urs Daellenbach, Willy-John Martin, and Te Taka Keegan.

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Could a re-jig of when the switches are flicked bring farmers big savings?

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How can we keep eyes on all that water?

Meet the researchers: Julie Choisne - One step at a time

In New Zealand children with cerebral palsy are not physically assessed until age six, in part because they need to be able to keep very still while 40 markers are exactingly fitted to their legs, and then be able to follow precise instructions about where and how to move in a purpose-built facility.

SfTI’s Julie Choisne is working on an alternative system that’s quick, mobile, inexpensive, and easy to fit to a child of any age.