Challenge background

Mō Te Wero

The Science for Technological Innovation Challenge (SfTI) launched in 2015. One of 11 National Science Challenges, SfTI is a 10-year, multi-million dollar Government investment whose mission is to grow a hi-tech New Zealand economy via the physical sciences and engineering.

The SfTI challenge is generously hosted by Callaghan Innovation.

Our vision

“New Zealand is a vibrant and prosperous technology-driven economy, with new businesses offering high-value services and products that may not yet have been invented.”

What we do

Kia kotahi mai - Te Ao Pūtaiao me Te Ao Hangarau: to come together, to join as one, the world of Science, the world of Innovation.

SfTI aims to develop world-leading science and technology relevant to New Zealand. Our focus is on building enduring partnerships between researchers, business, and Māori organisations.

How we operate

SfTI brings together some of New Zealand’s best physical science and engineering talent from our partner organisations.

Our researchers work in mission-led, multi-organisational, multi-disciplinary, science and engineering research teams that work closely with industry and Māori organisations.

Our partner organisations are:

The National Science Challenges 

The National Science Challenges are managed by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE). They are designed to take a more strategic approach to the government's science investment by targeting a series of goals, which, if achieved, would have major and enduring benefits for New Zealand.

The Government has allocated funding of $326.4 million over ten years for the National Science Challenges. In total almost $1.6 billion of funding will be invested in the National Science Challenges.

Read more about the National Science Challenges on the MBIE website

Visit the SfTI page on the MBIE website

Latest news and updates

Entrepreneur Kat Lintott joins SfTI Board

An entrepreneur with a passion for empowering people to make the world a better place through action has joined the Board of the Science for Technological Innovation National Science Challenge.

Meet the researchers: Will Browne - Artificial Intelligence from rat brains

Dr Will Browne, Associate Professor in the School of Engineering and Computer Science at Victoria University of Wellington, says modern artificial intelligence is still very easily fooled.

Meet the researchers: Jens Dietrich - Bugging out

Software problems do more than slow your computer down.  Your car won’t start, and for those who can remember back to Y2K, there’s the general fear that everything could suddenly screech to a grinding halt.